Nephroprevention in the very elderly patient
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Keywords

Nephroprevention
chronic renal failure
very elderly

How to Cite

1.
Musso CG, Vilas M. Nephroprevention in the very elderly patient. Rev. Colomb. Nefrol. [Internet]. 2016 Jan. 9 [cited 2021 Dec. 7];2(2):131-6. Available from: https://www.revistanefrologia.org/index.php/rcn/article/view/213

Abstract

Nephroprevention consists of a set of measures to attempt to prevent or slow kidney damage. Primary nephroprevention is the term used when such measures seek to reduce the risk of  installing an acute renal failure; and secondary prevention or nephroprotection is used when attempting to slow the progression of chronic renal failure. Regarding nephroprotection, the measures implemented for this purpose in young and very elderly (age>75 years) patients are often similar, based on the modulation of the diet, blood pressure levels, hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin, and the type and dose of medication delivered. However, given that those objectives can induce complications in the very elderly, less strict targets must be sought,
while respecting certain well-defined limits.
https://doi.org/10.22265/acnef.2.2.213
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